Tintin : Book 14

Prisoners of the Sun is the fourteenth book in  The Adventures of Tintin series, comprisingof 24 comics created by the Belgian cartoonist Georges Remi, who wrote under the pen name Hergé. The series was one of the most popular European comics of the 20th century. Tintin is the titular protagonist of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. He is a reporter and adventurer who travels around the world with his dog Snowy. By 2007, a century after Hergé’s birth in 1907, Tintin had been published in more than 70 languages with sales of more than 200 million copies, and had been adapted for radio, television, theatre, and film.

This was the first story published in TINTIN magazine when it was launched on 26th September 1946, and heralded the opportunity for the continuation of an adventure which had been interrupted two years earlier. Tintin, Snowy and Captain Haddock fly to Peru in search of Professor Calculus, who has involuntarily committed sacrilege, and has been condemned to suffer the ultimate punishment.

Trivia

Hergé regularly visited the Cinquantenaire museum, part of the Royal Museums of Art and History in Brussels, when conducting research for his stories. In this museum he saw a model of a ‘portrait vase’ also known as a ‘stirrup vase’ because it has a stirrup-shaped handle through which one could pass a rope to attach it and other similar vases on to the llama. This vase dates back to the Mochica culture and was the inspiration for the vase drawn on page 45 of the adventure.

Next book in the series: Land of Black Gold

Tintin : Book 13

The Seven Crystal Balls is the thirteenth book in  The Adventures of Tintin series, comprisingof 24 comics created by the Belgian cartoonist Georges Remi, who wrote under the pen name Hergé. The series was one of the most popular European comics of the 20th century. Tintin is the titular protagonist of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. He is a reporter and adventurer who travels around the world with his dog Snowy. By 2007, a century after Hergé’s birth in 1907, Tintin had been published in more than 70 languages with sales of more than 200 million copies, and had been adapted for radio, television, theatre, and film.

In The Seven Crystal Balls (1948), Seven scientists mysteriously fall into a profound state of lethargy. As Calculus has disappeared,Tintin and Captain Haddock set off in search of the Professor. Created in 1929 by Georges Rémi – who was already signing his drawings under the pseudonym of Hergé – Tintin will be subjected to twenty three adventures whose success – among those between 7 and 77 – has yet to wither.

Next book in the series: Prisoners of the Sun

Tintin : Book 5

The Blue Lotus is the fifth book in  The Adventures of Tintin series, comprisingof 24 comics created by the Belgian cartoonist Georges Remi, who wrote under the pen name Hergé. The series was one of the most popular European comics of the 20th century. Tintin is the titular protagonist of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. He is a reporter and adventurer who travels around the world with his dog Snowy. By 2007, a century after Hergé’s birth in 1907, Tintin had been published in more than 70 languages with sales of more than 200 million copies, and had been adapted for radio, television, theatre, and film.

The story unfolds in China, a place as yet unknown and mysterious to Tintin. It looks like our hero may have bitten off more than he can chew as he takes on the task of wiping out the international opium trade, which has a vice-like grip on this beautiful country. With the assistance of the secret society Sons of the Dragon, and his friend Chang, whom he encounters later on in the story, Tintin succeeds in overcoming myriad obstacles to finally triumph over his adversaries and disband their network of corruption.

Tintin finds himself alone in the vastness of China, the most populous country in the world. Solitude is not his only problem however, as he has to face treachery, conspiracy, a death sentence and madness alongside a routine of physical threats and even natural disasters, all getting in the way of his worthy mission. Tintin’s resoluteness and ability to overcome these myriad pitfalls is the true measure of his success.

Next book in series : The Broken Ear

Tintin : Book 3

Tintin in America is the third book in  The Adventures of Tintin series, comprisingof 24 comics created by the Belgian cartoonist Georges Remi, who wrote under the pen name Hergé. The series was one of the most popular European comics of the 20th century. Tintin is the titular protagonist of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. He is a reporter and adventurer who travels around the world with his dog Snowy. By 2007, a century after Hergé’s birth in 1907, Tintin had been published in more than 70 languages with sales of more than 200 million copies, and had been adapted for radio, television, theatre, and film.

In Tintin in America (1932), Tintin confirms his reputation as a righter of wrongs. He faces Al Capone and his gang as well as all sorts of other villains. Hergé shows his generous vision of the world as he offers a very well documented depiction of the sad plight of the Native Americans. Tintin’s fame extends beyond the Atlantic Ocean, so, when he arrives in Chicago in the middle of Prohibition, all the gangsters in the city have gathered to make sure that he gets the most uncomfortable reception. Tintin will need to use all his determination and intelligence to survive! Tintin in America is the highest-selling Tintin title of all time. It is the clear winner ahead of Tintin in the Congo and Explorers on the Moon.

Some Interesting Trivia

Tintin in America is one of the nine stories that were first published in black and white. From the ten years between 1932 and 1942, eleven editions of the book were produced. It is also the last story which was published under the Le Petit “Vingtième” label. During this period, more than 150,000 black and white Tintin books were printed, bound, distributed and sold. The book was also reworked in 1945, when Hergé began reformatting his black and white stories to create colour versions. In the new version, which appeared in 1946, many improvements were made to the illustrations.

For the background to Tintin in America, Hergé was influenced by lectures he attended and also particularly by Georges Duhamel’s book Scènes de la vie future (1930), which was openly and vehemently critical against the American lifestyle, sweeping modernisation, Taylorism, assembly line manufacturing and mass-marketing.

To accurately portray life in the USA at the time the story is set, Hergé also turned to Le Crapouillot magazine, which had published a special edition devoted to the United States.

Al Capone is the only real-life character in Tintin’s adventures to have been drawn into the story under his real name. In fact, Al Capone’s name had already been mentioned in Tintin in the Congo, as the head of an international diamond smuggling ring.

“Nowhere does Hergé’s art give such a strong impression of being directly influenced by the cinema than in the pages of Tintin in America”

Hergé made use of diverse techniques to mimic camera effects, as a way of developing the “final edit” frame by frame.

Next book in the series : Cigars of the Pharaoh.

Tintin : Book 2

Tintin in the Congo is the second book in  The Adventures of Tintin series, comprising of 24 comics created by the Belgian cartoonist Georges Remi, who wrote under the pen name Hergé. The series was one of the most popular European comics of the 20th century. Tintin is the titular protagonist of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. He is a reporter and adventurer who travels around the world with his dog Snowy. By 2007, a century after Hergé’s birth in 1907, Tintin had been published in more than 70 languages with sales of more than 200 million copies, and had been adapted for radio, television, theatre, and film.

The story of Tintin in the Congo, opens on a boat named ‘The Thysville’ heading to the Congo. Aboard the boat a man attempts to kill Snowy with a sharp stick. Snowy in a final effort to get away from the man, jumps out the window and falls into the water. Tintin dives into the water to save Snowy.

When they finally get to the Congo, they are greeted by the natives. Tintin goes on some fun safaris, while getting attacked by crocodiles, elephants and even people who have intentions to harm him. Snowy was also stolen by a vicious monkey, and Tintin must retrieve him by using an assortment of different disguises.

Finally, it is time for Tintin and Snowy to leave the Congo, they board a plane back home, ready for their next adventure. 

Next in the series : Tintin in America.

Asterix & Obelix

Asterix or The Adventures of Asterix is a French bande dessinée series about Gaulish warriors, who have adventures and fight the Roman Empire during the era of Julius Caesar. The series first appeared in the Franco-Belgian comics magazine Pilote on 29 October 1959. It was written by René Goscinny and illustrated by Albert Uderzo until the death of Goscinny in 1977. Uderzo then took over the writing until 2009, when he sold the rights to publishing company Hachette. In 2013, a new team consisting of Jean-Yves Ferri (script) and Didier Conrad (artwork) took over. As of 2019, 38 volumes have been released, with the most recent released in October 2019.

René Goscinny, was a French comic editor and writer, who created the Astérix comic book series with illustrator Albert Uderzo. Raised largely in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where he attended French schools, he lived for a time in the United States. There he met Belgian cartoonist Morris. After his return to France, they collaborated for more than 20 years on the comic series Lucky Luke, in what was considered the series’ golden age.

He wrote Iznogoud with Jean Tabary. Goscinny also wrote a series of children’s books known as Le Petit Nicolas (Little Nicolas).

In 1959, the Édifrance/Édipresse syndicate started the Franco-Belgian comics magazine Pilote. Goscinny became one of the most productive writers for the magazine. In the magazine’s first issue, he launched Astérix, with Uderzo. The series was an instant hit and remains popular worldwide. Goscinny also restarted the series Le Petit Nicolas and Jehan Pistolet, now called Jehan Soupolet. Goscinny also began Jacquot le Mousse and Tromblon et Bottaclou with Godard.

Prior to creating the Asterix series, Goscinny and Uderzo had previously had success with their series Oumpah-pah, which was published in Tintin magazine. Astérix was originally serialised in Pilote magazine, debuting in the first issue on 29 October 1959. In 1961 the first book was put together, titled Asterix the Gaul. From then on, books were released generally on a yearly basis. Their success was exponential; the first book sold 6,000 copies in its year of publication; a year later, the second sold 20,000. In 1963, the third sold 40,000; the fourth, released in 1964, sold 150,000. A year later, the fifth sold 300,000; 1966’s Asterix and the Big Fight sold 400,000 upon initial publication. The ninth Asterix volume, when first released in 1967, sold 1.2 million copies in two days.

The magazine was bought by Georges Dargaud in 1960, and Goscinny became editor-in-chief. He also began new series like Les Divagations de Monsieur Sait-Tout (with Martial), La Potachologie Illustrée (with Cabu), Les Dingodossiers (with Gotlib) and La Forêt de Chênebeau (with Mic Delinx). With Tabary, he launched Calife Haroun El Poussah in Record, a series that was later continued in Pilote as Iznogoud. With Raymond Macherot he created Pantoufle for Spirou.

Alberto Aleandro Uderzo was a French comic book artist and scriptwriter. He is best known as the co-creator and illustrator of the Astérix series in collaboration with René Goscinny. He also drew other comics such as Oumpah-pah, again with Goscinny. Uderzo retired in September 2011.

Astérix was serialised in Pilote, and in 1961 the first story Astérix le gaulois (Asterix the Gaul) was published as an individual album. After Goscinny’s death in 1977, Uderzo continued to write and illustrate the books on his own, published by his own publishing house “Albert René”, though at a significantly slower pace, averaging one edition every three to five years compared to two editions a year when working with Goscinny.