Movie Shelf – Coco

Coco is a 2017 American computer-animated fantasy film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. Based on an original idea by Lee Unkrich, it is directed by him and co-directed by Adrian Molina. The film was scripted by Molina and Matthew Aldrich from a story by Unkrich, Jason Katz, Aldrich and Molina. Pixar began developing the animation in 2016; Unkrich and some of the film’s crew visited Mexico for research.

The concept for Coco is inspired by the Mexican holiday Day of the Dead. The protagonist, Miguel, is a twelve-year-old boy in the fictional Mexican town of Santa Cecilia—named for the patron saint of musicians—and he is trying to get out from under the shadow of his great-great-grandfather, who left his family to pursue a career as a musician. His wife, the ferocious Mamá Imelda, was left to take care of their young daughter, Coco. She instituted a permanent household ban on music and started making shoes.

We meet Coco as an old woman. Her daughter, Miguel’s grandmother, now runs the family and its shoemaking business with an iron chancla. Earnest, sweet Miguel teaches himself to play the guitar in the attic, watching and re-watching tapes of the bygone star Ernesto de la Cruz. On the Day of the Dead, he accidentally shatters a framed photograph on the family ofrenda, then spots a hidden detail in the picture, one that makes him suspect that his wayward ancestor was in fact de la Cruz himself. He sprints to the town mausoleum, hoping to borrow de la Cruz’s guitar and prove the value of music to his family. Instead, the guitar turns Miguel invisible, and whisks him across a skybridge covered in thick, soft marigold petals that glow like lava. He falls to his knees in the petals, and then looks up to see a grand floating metropolis, confetti-colored in the darkness: the Land of the Dead.

The rest of the movie are mostly set in this city of jubilant sugar-skull skeletons, where you exist only as long as you are remembered by the living. It is believed that you can cross over to the living world on the Day of the Dead, but only if your photo is on display. Miguel joins up with a raggedy show-biz hustler named Héctor, who’s desperate to get his picture back up on an ofrenda, and who says he can bring Miguel to de la Cruz. Héctor lives in a waterfront shantytown filled with people who are about to be forgotten; at one point, he begs a guitar for Miguel off an ill-tempered cowboy named Chicharrón, who vanishes as soon as Héctor finishes singing an old dirty song.

Eventually, Miguel realizes that Héctor is his real ancestor, and the movie sprints to a conclusion that’s as skillfully engineered to produce waterworks as the montage at the beginning of “Up.” But until the end, “Coco” is mostly, wonderfully, a mess of conflict and disappointment and sadness. Héctor seems to have failed everyone who takes a chance on him. Miguel’s face, painted in skeleton camouflage, often droops as if he were a sad little black-and-white dog. “Coco” is animated by sweetness, but this sweetness is subterranean, bursting through mostly in tiny details: the way that both Mamá Imelda and Miguel’s grandmother brandish shoes when they’re angry; or how the daffy Xolo dog that accompanies Miguel on his adventure is named Dante; or how the skeletons return to their city through the Day of the Dead’s efficient, declaring the churros and beer that their families gave them for their journey home.

It is Pixar’s nineteenth movie, but its first with a non-white protagonist; Lee Unkrich, the director and creator of the initial story, is white. The movie’s working title was “Día de los Muertos,”. But Unkrich and his team approached their subject with openness and collaborative humility. It grossed more than eight hundred million dollars worldwide, won two Oscars, and became the biggest blockbuster in Mexican history.

Coco premiered on October 20, 2017, during the Morelia International Film Festival in Morelia, Mexico. The film was praised for its animation, voice acting, music, emotional story, and respect for Mexican culture. The film won two Academy Awards for Best Animated Feature and Best Original Song, “Remember Me”.

Movie Time – Babe Pig In the City

Babe: Pig in the City is a 1998 Australian-American comedy-drama film and the sequel to the 1995 film Babe. It is co-written, produced and directed by George Miller, who co-wrote and produced the original film. The film was nominated for Best Original Song at the 1998 Academy Awards.

Months after the events of the first film, Babe and his master, Arthur Hoggett, are given a welcome home parade after Babe’s success as a “sheepdog”. One day, Babe inadvertently causes an accident and Arthur is severely injured. His wife, Esme, is unsuccessful tending the farm alone.

Soon, two men from the bank arrive to inform Esme that she and Arthur have not paid their rent on time, and they will soon be evicted. Esme locates a letter saying that if she enters Babe in a sheepdog herding contest, held at a fair far away, she will receive a large amount of money. She decides to enter Babe and they leave the farm together.

At the airport in the city of Metropolis, a sniffer dog falsely signals that Babe and Esme are carrying illegal substances. Airport security officers interrogate them, causing them to miss their connecting flight. An airport cleaner informs them about a hotel that is suitable for accommodating animals, so Esme and Babe go there.

While Esme runs an errand, Babe chases a black and white capuchin monkey after he steals Esme’s suitcase. Fleeing into a hotel room, Babe follows the capuchin monkey and meets three clothed chimpanzees named Bob, Zootie and Easy, as well as Thelonius, an orangutan butler for the landlady’s elderly uncle, Fugly Floom, a clown who kidnaps Babe to use in his act. Babe initially refuses, but accepts when the chimps mention a reward he will receive after doing the act.

When Esme returns, Fugly tricks her into thinking that Babe ran off into the city. Esme leaves to look for Babe, but is arrested after inadvertently causing mayhem with some hooligan bikers and police officers. Fugly performs his clown act at a hospital, but the act is thrown into chaos when Babe accidentally trips him and causes him to throw a flaming torch into the stage curtains, setting them on fire and forcing everyone out.

The next morning, Fugly goes to the hospital in a food coma escorted by the landlady. Babe is in his room, hungry and waiting for Esme to return. That night, the chimps try to steal food from a store and use Babe to distract two guard dogs, who chase Babe around the city. Babe falls into a river and swims away, but returns and saves one of the dogs from drowning. The bullterrier Tug becomes friends with Babe, and Babe invites him and the other homeless animals into the hotel. They share food and then sing, alerting the duck Ferdinand who was searching for Babe. Zootie gives birth to twins, and the animals celebrate.

Animal control officers are called to capture all the animals and seize them, except for Babe, the capuchin monkey, duck Ferdinand and jackrussellterrier Flealick. Remembering what Maa told him before her death, Babe decides to rescue them. The next day, Esme is released after explaining her predicament. That night, Babe, the capuchin monkey, Flealick, and Ferdinand sneak into animal control and open their friends’ cages. Esme returns to the hotel and reunites with the landlady, who is mourning her uncle’s death, and tells Esme that her neighbor, Hortense, was the one who got the animals taken away. Esme and the landlady confront Hortense to find out where the animals have been sent, then set off to find them.

Esme and the landlady track the animals to a charity dinner in the hospital’s ballroom, and manage to get them back. Afterwards, the landlady sells the hotel and gives the money to Esme so she can save the farm. The landlady and the animals come to stay at the farm, where Arthur has recovered from his injury. Arthur proudly watches Babe, and says, “That’ll do, pig. That’ll do.”

Movie Time – Jumanji the Next Level

Jumanji: The Next Level is a 2019 American fantasy adventure comedy film directed by Jake Kasdan and co-written by Kasdan, Jeff Pinkner, and Scott Rosenberg. It is a sequel to 2017’s Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, the second follow-up to 1995’s Jumanji, and is the fourth installment in the Jumanji franchise.

Three years after their adventure in Jumanji, Spencer Gilpin, Anthony “Fridge” Johnson, Martha Kaply, and Bethany Walker lead different lives, but plan a reunion brunch in Brantford, New Hampshire. Spencer, apprehensive of the meeting due to his comparatively dull life, contemplates returning to Jumanji where he had purpose, and spends his first night looking over the broken video-game system he held onto. The following day, his friends visit his home, meeting with Spencer’s grandfather Eddie, who is recovering from hip surgery, and Eddie’s former friend and business partner Milo Walker, who is visiting for an unknown reason. Learning that they have no idea where Spencer is, the group searches the house and finds the Jumanji game partially repaired in the basement. Realizing Spencer returned to the game, his friends decide to follow him.

The game malfunctions when starting up, drawing in Fridge, Martha, Eddie and Milo, leaving Bethany behind. Inside the game, Martha finds herself as her avatar Ruby Roundhouse, yet Fridge becomes Bethany’s avatar Professor Sheldon Oberon, while Eddie and Milo become Spencer and Fridge’s avatars Dr. Smolder Bravestone and Franklin “Mouse” Finbar respectively. After instructing Eddie and Milo on the game’s rules, the group encounters non-player character Nigel Billingsley, the game’s guide, who reveals that since its last use, Jumanji is suffering from a massive drought. To leave the game, Nigel reveals that the group must recover the “Falcon Jewel” – a magical necklace stolen by warlord Jurgen the Brutal – which can end the drought if brought before sunlight and uttering “Jumanji”. Bethany contacts fellow Jumanji alumnus Alex Vreeke for help.

Transported to a desert called the Dunes to track down Jurgen, and after narrowly escaping a flock of pursuing ostriches, the group encounters Spencer operating as skilled thief Ming Fleetfoot, a new avatar, who agrees to help them after blaming himself for their predicament. While attempting to escape the Dunes, the group faces new challenges and problems, along with collecting an in-game item called a Jumanji Berry, and discovering a pool of glowing green water that allows them to switch avatars.

The group infiltrates Jurgen’s fortress separately to rescue teammates and steal the Falcon Jewel. While scaling the ice wall to the fortress, Martha asks Spencer why he abandoned his old life and her, prompting Spencer to admit that Martha’s success at college made him insecure about himself. Martha consoles him and reminds him that he needs his friends when he is scared and insecure. When the confrontation turns into a battle, Spencer pursues Jurgen to his airship, while the others distracted his men.

Returning the necklace to Nigel for safekeeping, the group is surprised when Milo elects to stay behind and protect the land. Upon returning to the real world, Spencer teaches his grandfather about video games. Eddie, having gotten over his resentment, convinces Nora the owner of his old diner to hire him on as a manager. His grandson and friends are there too for their reunion.

In a mid-credits scene, the heating mechanic who Spencer’s mother hired finally shows up, only to be drawn to the game. The flock of ostriches from the game rush past the diner.

Jumanji: The Next Level was theatrically released in the United States on December 13, 2019, by Sony Pictures Releasing, under its Columbia Pictures label. The film received generally positive reviews from critics, it was the tenth highest-grossing film of 2019.

Home Alone 3 – Must watch Movies

Home Alone 3 is a 1997 American family comedy film written and produced by John Hughes. It is the third film in the Home Alone series and the first not to feature actor Macaulay Culkin and the cast from the previous films, nor director Chris Columbus and composer John Williams. It is also the final film in the Home Alone franchise to receive a theatrical release. The film is directed by Raja Gosnell (in his directorial debut), who served as the editor of both original films. It stars Alex D. Linz and Haviland Morris. The film tells of an eight-year-old child prodigy who defends his home from a dangerous band of spies who work for a North Korean terrorist organization.

Peter Beaupre, Alice Ribbons, Burton Jernigan, and Earl Unger are four internationally wanted spies working for a North Korean terrorist organization. After stealing a $10 million missile-cloaking microchip, the spies put it inside a remote control car to sneak it past security at the airport. However, a woman named Mrs. Hess inadvertently takes the spies’ bag containing the car, while returning home to Chicago. The four spies arrive in Chicago and systematically search every house in Hess’s suburban neighborhood to find the chip.

8-year-old Alex Pruitt is given the remote control car by Hess for shoveling her driveway, but she lectures him for scratching in public. He returns home and discover that he has chickenpox and must stay out of school. The next day, Alex discovers the spies while spying on his neighbors. After two failed attempts at reporting them, Alex attaches a camera to the remote control car and uses it to spy on them, leading to the spies chasing it when they spot it. Wondering what they want with the toy car, Alex opens it and discovers the stolen chip. He informs the local Air Force Recruitment Center about the chip while asking if they can forward the information about the chip to the right authorities.

The spies finally realize that Alex has been watching them and decide to break into his house. Alex rigs the house with booby traps with help from his pet rat Doris and his brother’s loud-mouthed parrot. Beaupre, Alice, Jernigan and Unger break in, spring the traps, and suffer various injuries. While the four pursue Alex around the house, he flees and rescues Hess, who has been duct taped to a chair in her garage by Alice. Beaupre ambushes Alex, but Alex uses a bubble gun resembling a Glock to scare him off and rescue Hess.

Meanwhile, FBI agents arrive at Alex’s siblings’ school after being tipped off. Alex’s family brings the agents and the police to their house, where they arrest Alice, Jernigan, and Unger. However, Beaupre flees to the snow fort in the backyard. The parrot drives the remote control car into the snow fort and threatens to light fireworks, which are lined around the inside. Beaupre offers a cracker in exchange for silence, but the parrot demands two. Since Beaupre has only one, the parrot then lights the fireworks and flees. Beaupre is discovered and arrested.

Later, the Pruitts, Agent Stucky, and Hess celebrate with Jack returning home from a business trip, while Alex’s house is being repaired. The spies are shown to have contracted Alex’s chickenpox during their mugshots.

Must watch Movies – Devil Wears Prada

The Devil Wears Prada is a 2006 American comedy-drama film directed by David Frankel and produced by Wendy Finerman. The screenplay, written by Aline Brosh McKenna, is based on Lauren Weisberger’s 2003 novel of the same name.

Andy is an aspiring journalist fresh out of Northwestern University. Despite her ridicule for the shallowness of the fashion industry, she lands a job as junior personal assistant to Miranda Priestly. Andy plans to put up with Miranda’s excessive demands and humiliating treatment for one year in the hopes of getting a job as a reporter or writer somewhere else.

At first, Andy fumbles with her job and fits in poorly with her gossipy, fashion-conscious co-workers, especially Miranda’s senior assistant, Emily Charlton. After a disastrous dress trial meeting in which Miranda berates her in front of the entire team, she approaches art director Nigel to help her learn the ropes in the world of fashion. She begins to dress stylishly and starts showing effort for the position, accommodating all of Miranda’s whims and fancies. Problems arise in her relationship with her chef boyfriend, Nate, who increasingly finds her spending all her time at her new boss’s beck and call.

Miranda starts to notice Andy’s changed appearance and commitment and begins to give her more responsibility and complicated tasks to handle. Slowly but surely, Andy becomes more glamorous and begins aligning herself, unwittingly at first, to the Runway philosophy. She gradually begins to outperform Emily at her job.

In Paris, Andy learns from Miranda herself about her impending divorce. Later that night, Nigel tells Andy that he has accepted a job as creative director with rising designer James Holt. Further, Andy spends the night with an attractive young writer, Christian Thompson, who reveals to her that Miranda is set to be replaced by Jacqueline Follet as editor of Runway. Feeling bad for Miranda in her current situation, Andy attempts to warn her but does not manage to get through.

At a luncheon later that day, however, Miranda announces Jacqueline as the new creative director to Holt, leaving Andy and Nigel stunned. Later in the car, Miranda explains to Andy that she already knew of the plot to replace her and sacrificed Nigel instead to keep her own job.

Sometime later, Andy meets up with Nate and apologizes, though it is unclear if they eventually reconcile as Nate found a new job as a sous chef in Boston. The same day, Andy is interviewed and accepted to work at a major New York publication company. The editor recounts how he called Runway for a reference, and was told by Miranda herself that he would be an idiot not to hire Andy. While passing the Runway office building in the evening, Andy sees Miranda get into a car and waves. Miranda does not acknowledge or wave back, but smiles to herself once she is seated in the car.

Movie Time – The Shallows

Movie Time – The Shallows

The Shallows is a 2016 American survival film directed by Jaume Collet-Serra, written by Anthony Jaswinski and starring Blake Lively. In the film, a surfer gets stranded 200 yards (180 m) from shore, and must use her wits and determination to survive a great white shark attack. Principal photography began in October 2015 in New South Wales and Queensland, Australia.

Shortly after the death of her mother due to cancer, medical student Nancy Adams travels to a secluded beach in Mexico. , the same beach her mother visited while she was pregnant with Nancy. Carlos, a friendly local resident, gives Nancy a ride and drops her off at the beach, while a friend of hers who came along with her is staying back at a hotel after partying too much. Nancy joins two other locals and the three surf for several hours. Taking a break from surfing, Nancy video-chats with her younger sister Chloe. When she talks to her father in an emotional and strained conversation, it is revealed that her mother’s death caused Nancy to consider dropping out of medical school.

While surfing one last time for the day, Nancy notices the carcass of a large humpback whale nearby. As she rides the last wave back to the beach, a large great white shark knocks her off her surfboard and bites her leg. Nancy climbs onto the whale carcass, but the shark rams it from underneath, forcing her to swim to an isolated rock. She uses her surfboard strap to slow the bleeding from her leg.

One of the local surfers was wearing a GoPro camera on his helmet. When he was attacked by the shark, his helmet had come off and floated to the surface. Nancy later sees the helmet floating in the water. After some struggle, she is able to retrieve it and notices in the footage of the attack, the shark has a large hook stuck in its mouth after a possible encounter with fishermen. Nancy uses the GoPro to leave messages for her sister and father as well as information about the shark attack and her location.

With high tide approaching, Nancy realizes the rock will be submerged soon. After sending Steven Seagull toward shore on a piece of the surfboard, and timing the shark’s circles from the whale carcass to the rock, Nancy swims to a nearby buoy, narrowly avoiding the shark by swimming through a group of jellyfish, which sting both the shark and her. Nancy finds a flare gun on the buoy. She shoots one flare to draw the attention of a faraway cargo ship, but the ship has already turned away and does not see her. She then fires another flare at the shark, setting the oil from the whale carcass alight and angering it, but otherwise having no effect. The shark then ferociously attacks the buoy and rips out the chains securing it to the ocean bed. Nancy straps herself to the last remaining chain and as it is ripped from the buoy, she is pulled down to the ocean floor, pursued by the shark. At the last moment, Nancy pulls out of the dive, and the shark impales itself on some rebar from the buoy’s anchor.

Later, a boy named Miguel (from the opening of the film at the beach) finds the action camera and informs his father, then revealed to be Carlos. Carlos finds Nancy floating close to shore and revives her. Nancy briefly sees a hallucination of her mother. As she looks around the beach, she sees that Steven Seagull has made it to the shore. One year later, a healed Nancy (now a doctor) and her sister Chloe go surfing in Galveston, Texas, as their father tells Nancy that her mother would have been proud.

Brave – Movie Time

Brave is a 2012 fantasy film from Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. It was directed by Mark Andrews and Brenda Chapman and co-directed by Steve Purcell. The story is by Chapman, with the screenplay by Andrews, Purcell, Chapman and Irene Mecchi.

The movie is set in Medieval Scotland, Princess Merida of the clan Dunbroch is given a bow and arrow by her father, King Fergus, for her sixth birthday to the slight dismay of her mother, Queen Elinor. While venturing into the woods to fetch a stray arrow, Merida encounters a will-o’-the-wisp. Soon afterward, Mor’du, a huge demon bear, attacks the family. Merida flees on horseback with Elinor while Fergus and his men fend off Mor’du, though the fight costs him one of his legs.

Ten years later, Merida, now a free-spirited and fiery young woman who dislikes her duties and is now big sister to identical triplets—Harris, Hubert, and Hamish—discovers that she is to be betrothed to the son of one of her father’s allies. Elinor (who is overbearingly strict with Merida when it comes to her duties as a princess) explains that failure to consent to the betrothal could harm Dunbroch, reminding Merida of a legend of a prince whose pride and refusal to follow his father’s wishes destroyed his kingdom.

The allied clan chieftains and their first-born sons arrive to compete in the Highland games for Merida’s hand in marriage. Merida twists the rules, announcing that as her own clan’s firstborn she is eligible to compete for her own hand. She easily bests her suitors in an archery contest, shaming the other clans, and after a heated argument with Elinor, runs away into the forest. Wisps appear, leading her to the hut of an elderly witch. Merida bargains for a spell to change her fate, and the witch gives her an enchanted cake.

When Merida gives Elinor the cake, it transforms her into a bear, unable to speak but still retaining her human consciousness. Merida returns to the witch’s cottage with Elinor, only to find it deserted, and discovers a message from the witch: unless Merida is able to “mend the bond torn by pride” before the second sunrise, the spell will become permanent. Merida once again tries to look for an answer, but ends up destroying the witch’s cottage. She then spends the night with her mother and teaches the queen what she knows about wilderness survival, bonding with her as a result. However, Merida soon discovers that Elinor is slowly losing her human consciousness, turning more and more into a real bear. Merida and Elinor are then led by the wisps to ancient ruins, where they encounter Mor’du. Realizing that Mor’du was the prince in the legend her mother told her, Merida vows that she will not let the same thing happen to her mother. She soon comes to a conclusion that the witch meant for her to re-stitch up her mother’s tapestry (which Merida tore through with her sword after her argument with her mother), and decides to sneak back into the castle so they can find the tapestry and reverse the curse.

With Mor’du gone, Merida and Elinor work together on a new tapestry when they are called to the docks to bid farewell to the other clans, and ride their horses together.

The film won the Academy Award, the Golden Globe, and the BAFTA Award for Best Animated Feature Film. Preceding the feature theatrically was a short film entitled La Luna, directed by Enrico Casarosa.

Mr. Peabody & Sherman

Peabody and Sherman is a likable, surreal and often funny animated feature written by Craig Wright and directed by Rob Minkoff, director of the “Stuart Little” films and co-helmer for “The Lion King”. The movie concept is inspired from a recurring segment of the old 1960s US TV show Rocky and Bullwinkle. The characters from the beloved Rocky and Bullwinkle shows of the 1960s mixed arch intelligence with kid confusion to the delight of the Saturday-morning cartoon crowd a generation ago. Mr Peabody is a super-intelligent beagle resident in a spectacular New York apartment who has been granted the right to adopt a human boy, a seven-year-old Sherman. Mr Peabody is a finicky and precise but very caring foster parent, with a slight resemblance to Dr Niles Crane in the 90s TV show Frasier, as played by David Hyde Pierce. He wants to complete young Sherman’s historical education with a time-machine he has invented, allowing them both to visit various important eras

The story is “Modern Family”-friendly in other ways. Mr. Peabody is reimagined as an actual rather than implied father to the young boy Sherman (Max Charles). It’s an adoption situation, one that is suddenly in jeopardy, a theme that drives the film. The explanation of why a canine could adopt a boy in the first place is none too subtle in suggesting contemporary dilemmas.

We get the back story of Sherman found as an abandoned baby by the brilliant beagle along with a laundry list of Mr. Peabody’s many accomplishments: Harvard degree, inventor, business titan, mixologist… Though maybe that last talent is saved for later. It serves as a setup for anyone unfamiliar with the basic conceit — the dog is the superior being — and a mechanism to explain the changes made in moving from short TV segment to main big-screen attraction.

It is the first DreamWorks animated feature to feature characters from the Classic Media library since DreamWorks Animation’s 2012 acquisition of Classic Media, the first animated adaptation of a Jay Ward property, and Minkoff’s first animated film after having co-directed The Lion King for Disney in 1994. The film premiered on February 7, 2014 in the United Kingdom, and was released theatrically on March 7, 2014 in the United States. Grossing a worldwide total of 275 million USD on its 145 million USD budget.